For Patients

MyDrug

What is the MyDRUG study?

MyDRUG (Myeloma – Developing Regimens Using Genomics) is a groundbreaking cancer clinical trial testing several new treatments for patients with high-risk multiple myeloma.

MyDRUG is the MMRF’s boldest and most ambitious clinical effort to date. It builds upon and is made possible only by previous innovations and discoveries, which fundamentally transformed how doctors and scientists understand multiple myeloma.

  • The MMRF Tissue Bank, which for the first time brought together patients’ tissue and other biospecimens needed to rapidly advance research
  • Sequencing for the first time the multiple myeloma genome in its entirety, which revealed genetic mutations and molecular abnormalities that affect how multiple myeloma progresses and responds to treatment
  • The MMRF CoMMpass study, which defined 12 sub-types of multiple myeloma based on the genetic features previously identified and newly discovered through CoMMpass

Now, through the MyDRUG clinical trial, we are testing drugs designed specifically for each sub-type, greatly improving the odds of getting the treatment that will help you most.

Unlike traditional clinical trials, which test one drug or a single combination of drugs, the MyDRUG clinical trial tests the impact of several different drugs on different genetic mutations. This not only quickens the speed by which new treatments are tested but also more efficiently matches patients to treatments that are most likely to be beneficial.

Spearheaded and funded by the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation (MMRF), the MyDRUG clinical trial is enrolling patients at 17 cancer centers and academic research institutions throughout the United States that are part of the MMRF’s research collaborative, the Multiple Myeloma Research Consortium (MMRC).

Clinical Trial Finder

I want to join the MyDRUG clinical trial. How do I find a center that is participating?
The MyDRUG clinical trial will enroll patients at 17 cancer centers and academic research institutions throughout the United States that are part of the MMRF’s research collaborative, the Multiple Myeloma Research Consortium (MMRC). To learn more about joining the MyDRUG clinical trial, contact a nurse navigator at the MMRF Patient Support Center at 866-603-6628.

Who can enroll in the MyDRUG clinical trial? 
The MyDRUG clinical trial is for multiple myeloma patients who have:

  • Received at least one but no more than three prior therapies
  • Relapsed within 12-18 months of starting their second-line treatment or were refractory to their initial treatment

To find out if you are eligible to join the MyDRUG clinical trial, contact a nurse navigator at the MMRF Patient Support Center at 866-603-6628.

What will happen if I join the MyDRUG clinical trial?
If you are eligible to enroll in the MyDRUG clinical trial, you will be asked to give your permission to have your genome sequenced, a type of testing that deeply analyzes a person’s cancer cells to look for cancer-related genetic mutations and other abnormalities. You will undergo a bone marrow biopsy, which will then be sent immediately to the University of Michigan to be sequenced. Based on sequencing results, you will be assigned to a treatment that specifically targets the unique features of your cancer (see diagram below). For example, if you are found to have an FGFR3 mutation, you will be assigned to the FGFR3 arm and will receive treatment known to target this mutation. In addition, you will be given a standard of care triplet regimen of Ninlaro/Pomalyst/dexamethasone, also known as IPD.

How will you decide which treatment arm I would be placed in?
Based on the results of your genomic sequencing, study investigators will assign you to one of the several treatments in the MyDRUG clinical trial that precisely targets the unique genetics—mutated genes or other abnormalities—of your cancer. For example, if you are found to have an FGFR3 mutation, you will be assigned to the FGFR3 arm and will receive treatment known to target this mutation.

What if I do not have a genetic mutation that is covered by one of the treatments being tested in the MyDRUG clinical trial?
All patients participating in the MyDRUG clinical trial will receive treatment, including patients for whom a genetic mutation is not identified. Patients who do not have a genetic mutation that would place them onto a specific arm of the study will receive the standard of care triplet regimen of Ninlaro/Pomalyst/dexamethasone, also known as IPD. No one gets a placebo.

How long does the MyDRUG clinical trial last?
There is no set end-date for the MyDRUG clinical trial. In theory, the MyDRUG clinical trial could enroll patients indefinitely. Treatments that are shown not to work in targeted patient populations will removed from the MyDRUG clinical trial and other new, targeted treatments will be added. If the drug you receive as part of the MyDRUG clinical trial does not work for you, you will be removed from the study.

How is the MyDRUG clinical trial different from other multiple myeloma clinical studies?
The MyDRUG clinical trial is an entirely new clinical study for multiple myeloma patients. Unlike most clinical trials, which test one drug or a combination of drugs, the MyDRUG clinical trial tests several treatments at once.

Based on their unique genetic make-up, patients enrolled in the MyDRUG clinical trial are assigned to a particular treatment known to precisely the mutations in their cancer. This kind of a clinical trial is sometimes called a platform trial. By testing multiple different treatments, platform trials are able to more quickly determine whether a treatment is effective and more efficiently identify individuals and small groups of patients who will reap the most benefit from the new treatment.

What is genomic (genetic) sequencing?
Genomic sequencing is a type of test that deeply analyzes a person’s cancer cells to look for cancer-related genetic mutations and other abnormalities. These insights can help doctors and researchers determine the best possible treatment for individual patients.

Where can I learn more about the MyDRUG clinical trial?
To learn more about the MyDRUG clinical trial, contact a nurse navigator at the MMRF Patient Support Center at 866-603-6628.