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MMRF Funded Grants

As the leading funder of multiple myeloma research, the MMRF has supported more than 325 research grants at over 125 institutions worldwide. The MMRF supports innovative research efforts in the most promising areas of multiple myeloma research through several grant-making programs. Please use the filtering options on the left side of this page to sort through the past MMRF grants shown below.

Please note that grant information for 1997-2005 has not yet been uploaded; thank you for your patience as we work to include this information.

Mechanism of anti-tumor effects induced by allogeneic donor-cell rejection
Year Awarded: 2007 Type of Grant: Research Fellow Awards
Location: United States Institution: Massachusetts General Hospital (The General Hospital Corp.)
Amount: $75,000 Investigator: Toshiki Saito
Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) can cure myeloma. The current theory on the way BMT works is that the donor bone marrow-derived cells recognize myeloma cells as foreign and kill them. However, this effect is linked to a life-threatening complication, where donor bone marrow-derived cells recognize the recipient as foreign and attack. Recently, we observed that BMT patients who rejected their donor cells and therefore did not get the above complication could surprisingly be cured of very advanced myeloma. We created a model using mice to analyze this phenomenon. In this project, I will dissect the mechanisms of this anti-tumor effect.

Osteoblast and their mesenchymal progenitors in myeloma.
Year Awarded: 2007 Type of Grant: Research Fellow Awards
Location: United States Institution: University of Arkansas
Amount: $75,000 Investigator: Igor Entin
Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a pre-cancerous state of multiple myeloma, an incurable tumor accompanied with severe bone destruction. Progression of MGUS and low stage myeloma to overt osteolytic disease is accompanied with disappearing of bone building cells ��_ osteoblasts, whereas osteoclasts, the cells, which destroy bone, increase their activity. Recent findings show that osteoblasts from the late stage of myeloma can inhibit myeloma cell growth. Using our human myeloma in mouse model this proposal addresses the hypothesis that interventions, which restore presence of inhibiting osteoblasts in bone, will prevent progression of myeloma and bone damage.

Biomarker Discovery and Validation in Multiple Myeloma Cells Using Multiple Proteomic Platforms.2007
Year Awarded: 2007 Type of Grant: Proteomics
Location: United States Institution: Indiana University (Indianapolis)
Amount: $750,000 Investigator: Mu Wang

Proteomic profiling in Multiple Myeloma
Year Awarded: 2007 Type of Grant: Proteomics
Location: United States Institution: University of Arkansas
Amount: $750,000 Investigator: Ricky Edmonson

Multiple Myeloma and Bone: Understanding the Destruction
Year Awarded: 2007 Type of Grant: Research Fellow Awards
Location: United States Institution: Mayo Clinic Rochester
Amount: $75,000 Investigator: Matthew Drake
More than 80% of patients with myeloma have bone damage, including severe bone pain and fractures. Myeloma cells themselves, however, do not destroy bone. Rather they change the activity of the body��_s own bone forming and bone degrading cells. Several factors produced by myeloma cells which can affect bone cells have been identified. The changes induced within bone forming and bone degrading cells, however, have not been determined. This application seeks to identify these changes. Such findings should identify ways in which these bone cell activities can be altered to reduce the skeletal destruction in patients with myeloma.

Targeting CD40 therapy using humanized Mabs alone or with ImiD3 in human Multiple Myeloma
Year Awarded: 2006 Type of Grant: Senior Research Awards
Location: United States Institution: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Amount: $100,000 Investigator: Yu-Tzu Tai

High throughput exon-scanning of Kinome in Multiple Myeloma
Year Awarded: 2006 Type of Grant: Senior Research Awards
Location: United States Institution: Mayo Clinic Arizona
Amount: $100,000 Investigator: Keith Stewart

Translation studies of IGFS/IGF-1R
Year Awarded: 2006 Type of Grant: Senior Research Awards
Location: United States Institution: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Amount: $100,000 Investigator: Constantine Mitsiades

Refining mechanisms of resistance to Velcade: Clinical implication
Year Awarded: 2006 Type of Grant: Senior Research Awards
Location: United States Institution: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Amount: $100,000 Investigator: Teru Hideshima

Establishment of a Panel of Diverse Human Myeloma Cell Lines
Year Awarded: 2006 Type of Grant: Cell Line
Location: United States Institution: Mayo Clinic Rochester
Amount: Not Available Investigator: Diane Jelinek
Multiple myeloma (MM) is a devastating plasma cell cancer. Median survival is currently ~3 years but some patients live longer than 10 years, underscoring the patient-to-patient variability of this disease. A valuable tool in better understanding the biology and treatment of disease has been the establishment and study of continuously growing human myeloma cell lines (HMCLs). However, currently existing HMCLs only provide a model system for one subgroup of MM disease (referred to as ��_nonhyperdiploid��_). The overall goal of this proposal is therefore to establish new HMCLs from patients with all types of myeloma, particularly those referred to as hyperdiploid.

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